Mélomane by nature. A 20-something businesswoman, nerd, and ambigamist in love with friends, wine, food, traveling, birds, words, a boy, and everything in between.
Proud supporter of FC Bayern München.

Catching Elephant is a theme by Andy Taylor

All original content by me is licensed under the CC BY-NC 3.0 License

 

Always shocked at the lack of email etiquette these days.

1) In a blind email, one great way to ensure I will not read your message nor take it seriously is to refer to me by my position instead of my name. I get it, mass mailers happen - Just use MailChimp, please.

2) The caps lock button is for parts numbers, not regular conversation. If half of your email is in caps and none of it is angry or all that important, you are indeed doing it wrong.

3) Similarly, your signature’s legal disclaimer should also be succinct. Two paragraphs of vaguely threatening language is really not going to ever stop someone from hitting the Forward button. Also, it is your fault if I received your message in error. Always double check your To field.

Good ol’ fashioned internet rant.

I’m crazy busy this coming semester. I have more on my plate than ever with the initiatives I’m working on at NEU and KPL, plus my own personal impending graduation, job hunt, and potential move.

I also just discovered that a tumor I once had removed has grown back. It was thankfully benign back then, but it was removed for good reason. I also assumed that it wouldn’t come back after removing it?

So of course, I do an internet search about lymphatic tissue that regrows and literally everything about it is related to cancer. Okay, I can deal with that, just gotta find the info I need… Plus the flu [symptoms] I just had, plus the night sweats from the past two weeks, plus the fact that I’ve been nothing but tired? Okay, that makes me pretty uneasy.

I would love to tell my body, “NOT NOW, YOU ASSHOLE. I’M JUST STARTING THE HARDEST SEMESTER OF MY COLLEGE CAREER AND YOU WANT TO WHAT?”

Anyway. I’m moving tomorrow and then starting classes, calling the doctor, holding e-board and chapter meeting, and EMPOWER e-board on Monday. 

I can do this […right?]

cranky, sleepless gf observations.

This is one of those posts I’m probably going to take down in a few hours’ time. BUT.

I’ve noticed that ever since Ben joined Apple, a myriad of acquaintances from his high school era are popping up from the woodwork to be present in his social networking sphere. [Yes, people who not only aren’t personally in touch, but even went dark on the social networking channels.] I’m not talking about real friends here; This is about the kind of people who’ve been all but absent for the past 3 years. 3 years during which, no exaggeration, Ben has accomplished so much that competes with employment at Apple. 

There’s been more than a few of us who’ve bothered to stay in touch regardless of who his employer was or where he worked. So where were you? And, he might be too polite to say anything about it, but he’s not stupid - Don’t think he hasn’t noticed your timely reappearance either.

Oh, and the asking-for-Apple-swag-but-don’t-actually-want-to-meet-up thing? Sorry, but you’re an awful person. My boyfriend is not a coupon book.

Okay, no. While I do understand the “higher ed. is a near-corrupt institution” point behind this person’s picture/essay (text version here), and I respect that their opinion is especially qualified due to their experience in attaining their Ivy Ph.D, it’s hard for me to read “i am the 99%" at the bottom without facepalming.
Everything has its context: To be fair, this essay is part of a collection written so that we can see that people of all walks of life belong in the 99% of people getting screwed by Wall Street.
HOWEVER, as an Ivy League graduate who did get in, who did manage to secure the scholarships and jobs to get you to where you are, you are miles above many folks who couldn’t attain the same for various reasons. Not only that, for every company who hates hiring Ivy kids because of their “sense of entitlement and superiority”* there are at least 10 who’ll welcome you with open arms and kick someone out on the way. Why? Because you a) have a degree, b) it’s from an Ivy, and c) you’re relatively young and don’t expect the kind of high salary needed to support both a family and your parents, like older employees do.
If you’re willing to bust your chops in the real world like you’ve done to attain your Ivy League status, you WILL get a job. Lean back on your Ivy credentials and expect that your hard work thus far will grant you immunity from the buttfxck that is today’s job market, and you won’t. No one has a job just waiting for them. If it’s any consolation, I promise you as someone with a degree in a technical science your future job will pay you very nicely. Congratulations, you [will] deserve it.
So yes, nice points about higher education. However, you are NOT a part of the 99% - And if you do, you’re floating in the cream at the top. And your higher education [mine as well] kind of was a privilege. You are blessed with a good brain, a good family/support system, the ability to work, and now a wonderful degree from a wonderful school. Cherish it. You are as lucky as much as you are a hard worker.
* A once-manager’s quote - Said out of personal experience or bitterness from an earlier rejection as a high schooler, I don’t know.
** Having walked both sides of the fence as someone who attended public school and then an elite private school, then attended an expensive-but-good private college while many of my classmates attended Ivies and then other friends community college, I’ve met so many different kinds of people: Those who deserved their place at Pingry/Ivy League. Those who maybe didn’t. Those who should’ve had a place but didn’t because of one small factor. Those who worked hard to get where they were, those who didn’t as much. And among them, those who understood how blessed they were, and those who felt they were still deserving of so much more. There are honestly scant few in that last category - Partially because my friends and acquaintances in the Ivies tend to be those who are humble and worldly, but also because there are only a handful of cases in which I could say that an Ivy Leaguer did not get less than they deserved and honestly earned themselves. If you are at an Ivy [or any higher ed institution, really], it means you have the potential to do whatever in this world that you want to. Your school is but an impetus - It’s still up to you to do what you need to achieve what you want to.

Okay, no. While I do understand the “higher ed. is a near-corrupt institution” point behind this person’s picture/essay (text version here), and I respect that their opinion is especially qualified due to their experience in attaining their Ivy Ph.D, it’s hard for me to read “i am the 99%" at the bottom without facepalming.

Everything has its context: To be fair, this essay is part of a collection written so that we can see that people of all walks of life belong in the 99% of people getting screwed by Wall Street.

HOWEVER, as an Ivy League graduate who did get in, who did manage to secure the scholarships and jobs to get you to where you are, you are miles above many folks who couldn’t attain the same for various reasons. Not only that, for every company who hates hiring Ivy kids because of their “sense of entitlement and superiority”* there are at least 10 who’ll welcome you with open arms and kick someone out on the way. Why? Because you a) have a degree, b) it’s from an Ivy, and c) you’re relatively young and don’t expect the kind of high salary needed to support both a family and your parents, like older employees do.

If you’re willing to bust your chops in the real world like you’ve done to attain your Ivy League status, you WILL get a job. Lean back on your Ivy credentials and expect that your hard work thus far will grant you immunity from the buttfxck that is today’s job market, and you won’t. No one has a job just waiting for them. If it’s any consolation, I promise you as someone with a degree in a technical science your future job will pay you very nicely. Congratulations, you [will] deserve it.

So yes, nice points about higher education. However, you are NOT a part of the 99% - And if you do, you’re floating in the cream at the top. And your higher education [mine as well] kind of was a privilege. You are blessed with a good brain, a good family/support system, the ability to work, and now a wonderful degree from a wonderful school. Cherish it. You are as lucky as much as you are a hard worker.

* A once-manager’s quote - Said out of personal experience or bitterness from an earlier rejection as a high schooler, I don’t know.

** Having walked both sides of the fence as someone who attended public school and then an elite private school, then attended an expensive-but-good private college while many of my classmates attended Ivies and then other friends community college, I’ve met so many different kinds of people: Those who deserved their place at Pingry/Ivy League. Those who maybe didn’t. Those who should’ve had a place but didn’t because of one small factor. Those who worked hard to get where they were, those who didn’t as much. And among them, those who understood how blessed they were, and those who felt they were still deserving of so much more. There are honestly scant few in that last category - Partially because my friends and acquaintances in the Ivies tend to be those who are humble and worldly, but also because there are only a handful of cases in which I could say that an Ivy Leaguer did not get less than they deserved and honestly earned themselves. If you are at an Ivy [or any higher ed institution, really], it means you have the potential to do whatever in this world that you want to. Your school is but an impetus - It’s still up to you to do what you need to achieve what you want to.

C on a paper, icing on the cake.

My professor thinks that I’ve plagiarized a paper (ie. not written down the source to crucial points made) that I wrote about the motorcycle industry. She commented this throughout the paper, but snarkily summarized at the end, “Did you intern in a leadership role that gave you the first-hand vantage to know all that you narrated? If so, that should be in the references – if not, you should have cited the source you used." It was her first and main complaint, and reasoning behind my grade.

First of all, the APA itself recommends that one does not cite or reference first-hand experiences, and also condones the use of experience and opinion in academic papers. I correctly did not use the first person to describe my opinion; I prescribed it.

Second of all, I didn’t freakin' intern in a “leadership role” - I AM a leadership role. I’m not taking business courses for shits and giggles here, I’m here to apply what I know and what I’ve done to real business theory. On the flip side, when you tell me this course relies much on sharing personal experience, I’ll do so for you, so don’t be so surprised that I know and reference some in-depth stuff about what I do.

Now, if you teach at Northeastern, you should know your students are probable and likely to hold/have held jobs now that you didn’t til after you graduated from undergrad or even grad school. In the beginning of the year, you made our 50-person class go one at a time and introduce ourselves, our major, our year, our knowledge thus far on ORGB, and our WORK EXPERIENCE. That took a hell of a long time - Are you saying it was for nothing? Did you forget what I said about working in the motorcycle industry? You were writing notes.

I take you seriously as a professor, you take me seriously as a student and businesswoman. It’s a matter of respect.

Love this professor and the class, but I’m dismayed that she doesn’t realize her allegation can easily 1) fail me out of the course, 2) get me kicked out of school. Not only that, she is going to look like a fool if she brings it up against the board when I have a slew of people in the industry who have seen me week after week in their conference rooms with yes, other people in “leadership roles”, and will vouch for not only my position but my knowledge that I used in this paper. 

Seriously, now? Ugh. Why the hell am I in school?